Dwellings

I Like Berlin… Version 2

Foto: Ulf Dieter

An evolution of I Like Berlin and Berlin Likes Me, constructed around a timber frame. The outside of the structure is covered with technical felt (synthetic and recycled). It is large enough to function as a compact living space.

This structure, with paintings hung inside it, is the starting point for the collberative project Dependent Rational Animals with Roxy Walsh.

Materials: Timber, MDF, technical felt.
Dimensions: 250 x 520 x 390cm (2012)

Foto: Ulf Dieter

Inside the structure

Foto: Ulf Dieter

Outside, showing the removal wall section

Foto: Ulf Dieter

Foto: Ulf Dieter

 

I Like Berlin and Berlin Likes Me

I Like Berlin and Berlin Likes Me

Photo: Ulf Dieter

A nine-sided (enneagram) timber frame underlies the structure. It is covered with layers of netting, insulation, concrete dipped canvas, pond lining and sheep skins. The very absorbent covering gives the structure a feeling of heaviness inside, inspired by Joseph Beuy’s felt roll rooms.

Materials: timber, insulation, polycarbonate sheet, pond lining, concrete, sheep fleeces
Dimensions: 3.5m x 4m x 4m
Constructed in my studio in SchlesischeStr in 2011

I Like Berlin and Berlin Likes Me (detail)

Photo: Ulf Dieter

I Like Berlin and Berlin Likes Me (detail)

Photo: Ulf Dieter

I Like Berlin and Berlin Likes Me (detail)

Photo: Ulf Dieter

I Like Berlin and Berlin Likes Me (detail)

Photo: Ulf Dieter

I Like Berlin and Berlin Likes Me (detail)

Photo: Ulf Dieter

I Like Berlin and Berlin Likes Me  (detail)

Photo: Ulf Dieter

 

The House that Became Part of itself

The House That Became Part of Itself

The House That Became Part of Itself

Sculpture outdoors presents me with something of a challenge: I find myself wondering whether the site would be better left empty. When nature is doing its job of occupying a space it seems that it could easily make a fool of one who assumed they can better it, Yet we have an impetus to occupy and control space and we need to construct shelters for ourselves. Shortly after arriving at Broomhill the word ‘fecund’ came into my mind and lodged itself there for the duration of the installation. As the issues of hubris and fecundity jostled in my mind with the desire to create a shelter in the woods, my solution was to half-occupy the space and allow nature to join the party, so I left the igloo frame open and vulnerable to its environment.

The final piece suggests a thwarted or abandoned project to make the camp in the woods, but occupies the space subtly so that some some angles it becomes almost invisible.

Materials: plywood, found logs, carpet underlay.
Constructed for the National Sculpture Prize at Broomhill Sculpture Park i 2010.

The House the Became Part of Itself (detail)

The House the Became Part of Itself (detail)

The House the Became Part of Itself (detail)

The House the Became Part of Itself (detail)

The House that Became Part of Itself (detail)

The House the Became Part of Itself (detail)

The House That Became Part of Itself – 4 months on..

By the end of the summer, nature’s fecundity had begun to consume the work.

The House That Became Part of Itself (4 months on)

The House That Became Part of Itself (4 months on)

The House That Became Part of Itself (detail 4 months on)

The House That Became Part of Itself ((detail 4 months on)

The House That Became Part of Itself (detail 4 months on)

The House That Became Part of Itself (detail 4 months on)

I Like Streatham and Streatham Likes Me

I Like Streatham and Streatham Likes Me

I Like Streatham and Streatham Likes Me

The shelter was constructed in the studio block’s gallery space, using scrap materials from the studio. I lived in it for a week.
(2009)

Greg’s Igloo

Greg's Igloo

Greg's Igloo

Igloo constructed with thick insulated walls and sittting on a heated floor, using the traditional inuit spiral construction method.

Materials: Thermal board
Dimensions: 1.2m x 18.m x 1.8m (2007)

 
 

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